HSCLB505 The partition cannot use hardware-accelerated encryption

When migrating LPARs using LPM onto a somewhat older hardware, the following error can occur:

HSCLB505 The partition cannot use hardware-accelerated encryption on the destination managed system because the destination managed system does not support hardware-accelerated encryption.

This means that hardware-accelerated encryption is activated for the LPAR, but is not supported on the destination managed system.

Disabling hardware-accelerated encryption using the LPAR-Tool is easy:

$ lpar -d chmem lpar01 hardware_mem_encryption=0
$

Without the LPAR-Tool this is of course also possible. Log into your HMC and use the following command from the commandoline:

chhwres -m ms01 -r mem -o s -p lpar01 -a 'hardware_mem_encryption=0'

Afterwards validation and migration using LPM should work.

HSCLB504 The migrating partition cannot use hardware-accelerated Active Memory Expansion

When migrating LPARs using LPM onto a somewhat older hardware, the following error can occur:

HSCLB504 The migrating partition cannot use hardware-accelerated Active Memory Expansion on the destination managed system because the destination managed system does not support hardware-accelerated Active Memory Expansion.

This means that Active Memory Erweiterung (AME) is activated for the LPAR, but is not supported on the destination managed system.

Disabling Active Memory Expansion using the LPAR-Tool is easy:

$ lpar -d chmem lpar01 hardware_mem_expansion=0
$

Without the LPAR-Tool this is of course also possible. Log into your HMC and use the following command from the commandoline:

chhwres -m ms01 -r mem -o s -p lpar01 -a 'hardware_mem_expansion=0'

Afterwards validation and migration using LPM should work.

LPAR-Tool in Action: Examples

The LPAR tool can administer HMCs, managed systems, LPARs and virtual-I/O-servers via the command line. The current version of the LPAR tool (currently 1.4.0.2) can be downloaded from our download page https://powercampus.de/download. A trial license, valid until October 31, is included. This article will show you some simple but useful applications of the LPAR tool.

A common question in larger environments (multiple HMCs, many managed systems) is: where is a particular LPAR? This question can easily be answered with the LPAR tool, by using the command “lpar show“:

$ lpar show lpar02
NAME    ID  SERIAL     LPAR_ENV  MS    HMCS
lpar02  39  123456789  aixlinux  ms21  hmc01,hmc02
$

In addition to the name, the LPAR-ID and the serial number, the managed system, here ms21, and the associated HMCs, here hmc01 and hmc02, are also shown. You can also specify multiple LPARs and/or wildcards:

$ lpar show lpar02 lpar01
...
$ lpar show lpar*
...
$

If no argument is given, all LPARs are listed.

 

Another question that frequently arises is the status of an LPAR or multiple LPARs. Again, this can be easily answered, this time with the command “lpar status“:

$ lpar status lpar02
NAME    LPAR_ID  LPAR_ENV  STATE    PROFILE   SYNC  RMC     PROCS  PROC_UNITS  MEM   OS_VERSION
lpar02  39       aixlinux  Running  standard  0     active  1      0.7         7168  AIX 7.2 7200-03-02-1846
$

The LPAR lpar02 is Running, the profile used is standard, the RMC connection is active and the LPAR is running AIX 7.2 (TL3 SP2). The LPAR has 1 processor core, with 0.7 processing units and 7 GB RAM. The column SYNC indicates whether the current configuration is synchronized with the profile (attribute sync_curr_profile).

Of course, several LPARs or even all LPARs can be specified here.

If you want to see what the LPAR tool does in the background: for most commands you can specify the option “-v” for verbose-only. The HMC commands will then be listed, but no changes will be made to the HMC. Here are the HMC commands that are issued for the status output:

$ lpar status -v lpar02
hmc01: lssyscfg -r lpar -m ms21
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms21 --level lpar
hmc01: lshwres -r proc -m ms21 --level lpar
$

 

Next, the addition of additional RAM will be shown. We start with the status of the LPAR:

$ lpar status lpar02
NAME    LPAR_ID  LPAR_ENV  STATE    PROFILE   SYNC  RMC     PROCS  PROC_UNITS  MEM   OS_VERSION
lpar02  39       aixlinux  Running  standard  0     active  1      0.7         7168  AIX 7.2 7200-03-02-1846
$

The LPAR is running and RMC is active, so a DLPAR operation should be possible. We will first check if the maximum memory size is already in use:

$ lpar lsmem lpar02
            MEMORY         MEMORY         HUGE_PAGES 
LPAR_NAME  MODE  AME  MIN   CURR  MAX   MIN  CURR  MAX
lpar02     ded   0.0  2048  7168  8192  0    0     0
$

Currently the LPAR uses 7 GB and a maximum of 8 GB are possible. Extending the memory by 1 GB (1024 MB) should be possible. We add the memory by using the command “lpar addmem“:

$ lpar addmem lpar02 1024
$

We check the success by starting the command “lpar lsmem” again:

$ lpar lsmem lpar02
           MEMORY         MEMORY         HUGE_PAGES 
LPAR_NAME  MODE  AME  MIN   CURR  MAX   MIN  CURR  MAX
lpar02     ded   0.0  2048  8192  8192  0    0     0
$

(By the way: if the current configuration is not synchronized with the current profile, attribute sync_curr_profile, then the LPAR tool also updates the profile!)

 

Virtual adapters can be listed using “lpar lsvslot“:

$ lpar lsvslot lpar02
SLOT  REQ  ADAPTER_TYPE   STATE  DATA
0     Yes  serial/server  1      remote: (any)/any connect_status=unavailable hmc=1
1     Yes  serial/server  1      remote: (any)/any connect_status=unavailable hmc=1
2     No   eth            1      PVID=123 VLANS= ETHERNET0 XXXXXXXXXXXX
6     No   vnic           -      PVID=1234 VLANS=none XXXXXXXXXXXX failover sriov/ms21-vio1/1/3/0/2700c003/2.0/2.0/20/100.0/100.0,sriov/ms21-vio2/2/1/0/27004004/2.0/2.0/10/100.0/100.0
10    No   fc/client      1      remote: ms21-vio1(1)/47 c050760XXXXX0016,c050760XXXXX0017
20    No   fc/client      1      remote: ms21-vio2(2)/25 c050760XXXXX0018,c050760XXXXX0019
21    No   scsi/client    1      remote: ms21-vio2(2)/20
$

The example shows virtual FC and SCSI adapters as well as a vNIC adapter in slot 6.

 

Finally, we’ll show how to start a console for an LPAR:

$ lpar console lpar02

Open in progress 

 Open Completed.

…

AIX Version 7

Copyright IBM Corporation, 1982, 2018.

Console login:

…

The console can be terminated with “~.“.

 

Of course, the LPAR tool can do much more.

To be continued.

 

Resources of not activated LPARs

When an LPAR is shutdown, resources such as processors, memory, and I/O slots are not automatically released by the LPAR. The resources remain assigned to the LPAR and are reused on the next activation (with the current configuration).

The article will show how such resources are automatically released and, if desired, how to manually release resources of an inactive LPAR.

(Note: In the example output, we use version 1.4 of the LPAR tool, but in all cases we show the underlying commands on the HMC command line, so you can try everything without using the LPAR tool.)

The example LPAR lpar1 was shut down, but currently still occupies 100 GB of memory:

linux $ lpar status lpar1
NAME   LPAR_ID  LPAR_ENV  STATE          PROFILE   SYNC  RMC       PROCS  PROC_UNITS  MEM     OS_VERSION
lpar1  39       aixlinux  Not Activated  standard  0     inactive  1      0.2         102400  Unknown
linux $

The following commands for the output above were executed on the corresponding HMC hmc01:

hmc01: lssyscfg -r lpar -m ms09 --filter lpar_names=lpar1
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level lpar --filter lpar_names=lpar1
hmc01: lshwres -r proc -m ms09 --level lpar --filter lpar_names=lpar1

The resource_config attribute of an LPAR indicates whether the LPAR has currently allocated resources (resource_config=1) or not (resource_config=0):

linux $ lpar status -F resource_config lpar1
1
linux $

Or on the HMC command line:

hmc01: lssyscfg -r lpar -m ms09 --filter lpar_names=lpar1 –F resource_config

The resources allocated by an not activated LPAR can be released in 2 different ways:

  1. Automatic: The resources used are needed by another LPAR, e.g. because memory is expanded dynamically or an LPAR is activated that does not have sufficient resources. In this case, resources are automatically removed from a not activated LPAR. We will show this below with an example.
  2. Manual: The allocated resources are explicitly released by the administrator. This is also shown below in an example.

First we show an example in which resources are automatically taken away from an not activated LPAR.

The managed system ms09 currently has about 36 GB free memory:

linux $ ms lsmem ms09
NAME  INSTALLED  FIRMWARE  CONFIGURABLE  AVAIL  MEM_REGION_SIZE
ms09  786432     33792     786432        36352  256
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level sys

We start an LPAR (lpar2) which was configured with 100 GB of RAM. The managed system has only 36 GB of RAM and is therefore forced to take resources from inactive LPARs in order to provide the required 100 GB. We start lpar2 with the profile standard and look at the memory relations:

linux $ lpar activate -b sms -p standard lpar2
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: chsysstate -m ms09 -r lpar -o on -n lpar2 -b sms -f standard

Overview of the storage relations of lpar1 and lpar2:

linux $ lpar status lpar\*
NAME   LPAR_ID  LPAR_ENV  STATE          PROFILE   SYNC  RMC       PROCS  PROC_UNITS  MEM     OS_VERSION
lpar1  4        aixlinux  Not Activated  standard  0     inactive  1      0.2         60160   Unknown
lpar2  8        aixlinux  Open Firmware  standard  0     inactive  1      0.2         102400  Unknown
linux $ ms lsmem ms09
NAME  INSTALLED  FIRMWARE  CONFIGURABLE  AVAIL  MEM_REGION_SIZE
ms09  786432     35584     786432        0      256
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: lssyscfg -r lpar -m ms09
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level lpar
hmc01: lshwres -r proc -m ms09 --level lpar
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level sys

The LPAR lpar2 has 100 GB RAM, the managed system has no more free memory and the memory allocated by LPAR lpar1 has been reduced to about 60 GB. Allocated resources from non-activated LPARs are automatically released, when needed and assigned to other LPARs.

But you can of course also release the resources manually. This is also shown briefly here. We are reducing the memory of LPAR lpar1 by 20 GB:

linux $ lpar -d rmmem lpar1 20480
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: chhwres -m ms09 -r mem  -o r -p lpar1 -q 20480

As stated, the allocated memory has been reduced by 20 GB:

linux $ lpar status lpar\*
NAME   LPAR_ID  LPAR_ENV  STATE          PROFILE   SYNC  RMC       PROCS  PROC_UNITS  MEM     OS_VERSION
lpar1  4        aixlinux  Not Activated  standard  0     inactive  1      0.2         39680   Unknown
lpar2  8        aixlinux  Open Firmware  standard  0     inactive  1      0.2         102400  Unknown
linux $ ms lsmem ms09
NAME  INSTALLED  FIRMWARE  CONFIGURABLE  AVAIL  MEM_REGION_SIZE
ms09  786432     35584     786432        20480  256
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: lssyscfg -r lpar -m ms09
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level lpar
hmc01: lshwres -r proc -m ms09 --level lpar
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level sys

The 20 GB are immediately available to the managed system as free memory. If you remove the entire memory or all processors (or processor units), then all resources of an inactive LPAR are released:

linux $ lpar -d rmmem lpar1 39680
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: chhwres -m ms09 -r mem  -o r -p lpar1 -q 39680

Here are the resulting memory relations:

linux $ lpar status lpar\*
NAME   LPAR_ID  LPAR_ENV  STATE          PROFILE   SYNC  RMC       PROCS  PROC_UNITS  MEM     OS_VERSION
lpar1  4        aixlinux  Not Activated  standard  0     inactive  0      0.0         0       Unknown
lpar2  8        aixlinux  Open Firmware  standard  0     inactive  1      0.2         102400  Unknown
linux $ ms lsmem ms09
NAME        INSTALLED  FIRMWARE  CONFIGURABLE  AVAIL  MEM_REGION_SIZE
ms09  786432     31232     786432        64512  256
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: lssyscfg -r lpar -m ms09
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level lpar
hmc01: lshwres -r proc -m ms09 --level lpar
hmc01: lshwres -r mem -m ms09 --level sys

The LPAR lpar1 now has 0 processors, 0.0 processor units and 0 MB of memory! In addition, the resource_config attribute now has the value 0, which indicates that the LPAR no longer has any resources configured!

linux $ lpar status -F resource_config lpar1
0
linux $

HMC command line:

hmc01: lssyscfg -r lpar -m ms09 --filter lpar_names=lpar1 –F resource_config

Finally, the question arises as to why you should release resources manually if they are automatically released by the managed system when needed?

We will answer this question in a second article.