Removal of Host-Key from ~/.ssh/known_hosts

Occasionally, a host key is changed on a host, either manually or possibly automatically through an update of OpenSSH. When you log in via ssh to the host in question you will get the following message:

$ ssh aix01
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
@    WARNING: REMOTE HOST IDENTIFICATION HAS CHANGED!     @
@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
IT IS POSSIBLE THAT SOMEONE IS DOING SOMETHING NASTY!
Someone could be eavesdropping on you right now (man-in-the-middle attack)!
It is also possible that a host key has just been changed.
The fingerprint for the RSA key sent by the remote host is
SHA256:xYglDF3cuHCCrxtbFUbpofpmhNs9MiO114vAT4qVX2M.
Please contact your system administrator.
Add correct host key in /home/as/.ssh/known_hosts to get rid of this message.
Offending RSA key in /home/as/.ssh/known_hosts:2
RSA host key for aix01 has changed and you have requested strict checking.
Host key verification failed.
$

Now many administrators use vi (or another editor) to remove the entry with the old host key from the known_hosts file. The line number of the corresponding entry is given in the output above, /home/as/.ssh/known_hosts:2 means the entry is in line 2 of the file.

It is much easier to remove the obsolete host key using the ssh-keygen command and the “-R” (remove) option:

$ ssh-keygen -R aix01
# Host aix01 found: line 2
/home/as/.ssh/known_hosts updated.
Original contents retained as /home/as/.ssh/known_hosts.old
$ 

The command creates a copy of the file, with the extension “.old” and removes the desired entry. This is much easier than using an editor!

If you want to know if a host key for a system already exists in the known_hosts, there is the option “-F” (find) for this purpose:

$ ssh-keygen -F aix02
# Host aix02 found: line 49 
aix02,192.168.178.49 ssh-rsa AAAAB3NzaC1yc2E...
$

The public host key and the line for the system are shown.

Cron-Jobs are not startet anymore

Recently, no cron job was started anymore on one of our AIX systems. There was no entry in the error report and no indication of the problem could be found by syslog. In the log of the cron daemon, however, there were a lot of messages:

# cat /var/adm/cron/log
...
! c queue max run limit reached Sat Feb 23 08:49:00 2019
! rescheduling a cron job Sat Feb 23 08:49:00 2019
...

On AIX, the number of active cron jobs is set to 100 by default. Obviously this number had been achieved on our system. New entries are then executed by default 60 seconds later. Both can be configured via the file /var/adm/cron/queuedefs. The value 100 is already quite high and reaching the value indicates a problem.

The PID of the cron daemon was quick to find out:

$ ps -ef|grep cron
    root  6684924        1   0   Sep 26      -  8:03 /usr/sbin/cron
$

The currently active cron jobs run as cron‘s child processes. With the option “-T” of the ps command, we can quickly list all children:

$ ps -T 6684924
      PID    TTY  TIME CMD
  6684924      -  8:03 cron
  3276876      -  0:00    |\--perl
  9961588      -  0:00    |    \--mount
 12714002      -  0:07    |        \--nfsmnthelp
  3604516      -  0:00    |\--perl
 20185130      -  0:00    |    \--mount
 10158264      -  0:35    |        \--nfsmnthelp
  4587542      -  0:00    |\--perl
...

It is immediately noticeable that the lines are repeated again and again, i.e. a perl program was started over and over again by cron, which tried to mount a file system via NFS, which did not work (no answer from the NFS server) and the perl script hangs. Since the script was restarted over and over again, at some point in time there were 100 active cron jobs and from that moment on no more cron jobs were started. We briefly count the active perl processes:

$ ps -T 6684924 |grep perl |wc -l
     100
$

There are exactly 100 perl processes started by cron. We terminate some of the hanging perl processes:

# kill 3276876 3604516  4587542
#

A look at the end of the cron log file shows, that jobs have been terminated, and after a short while the first newly started cron job appears:

# tail –f /var/adm/cron/log
…
Cron Job with pid: 3276876 Failed
Cron Job with pid: 3604516  Failed
Cron Job with pid: 4587542Failed
mqm       : CMD ( /appdata/mqm/admin/bin/checks/checkXmitMonitoring.sh >>/appdata/mqm/tracks/logs/scheduler/checkXmitMonitoring.fatal 2>&1 ) : PID ( 28442840 ) : Mon Feb 25 10:34:00 2019
…

We also terminate the other hanging processes and restart the cron daemon for safety’s sake by simply terminating it:

# kill 6684924
#

The cron daemon is automatically restarted thanks to an /etc/inittab entry:

# lsitab cron
cron:23456789:respawn:/usr/sbin/cron
#

After cron works again, the perl script should be examined, which ultimately led to the hanging of cron. For scripts started per cron, it is advisable to check whether the job is still running or already running.

Automatic creation of home directories

There are several possibilities under AIX to automatically create missing home directories when logging in. This is especially useful if the user accounts are managed through LDAP or another naming service and are not created locally. If a user is newly created in LDAP, he initially has no home directory on the AIX LDAP client:

$ ssh new_user@aix01
...
Could not chdir to home directory /home/new_user: No such file or directory
$ pwd
/
$ exit
$

Probably the easiest way to automatically create the home directory when logging in, is the attribute mkhomeatlogin in the file /etc/security/login.cfg. The default for this attribute is “false” if it is not set:

# lssec -f /etc/security/login.cfg -s usw -a mkhomeatlogin
usw mkhomeatlogin=
# 

The attribute can be set to true with the chsec command:

# chsec -f /etc/security/login.cfg -s usw -a mkhomeatlogin=true
# lssec -f /etc/security/login.cfg -s usw -a mkhomeatlogin
usw mkhomeatlogin=true
#

We try the login again:

$ ssh new_user@aix01
...
$ pwd
/home/new_user
$

A new home directory has been created for the user.

HMC Error #25B810

Managing and administrating service events is often forgotten on HMCs. In this article we want to use a concrete example, error with reference code #25B810, to show how to handle such events. Of course, our LPAR tool is used here.

First, let’s find all open service events:

$ hmc lssvcevents
TIME                 PROBLEM  PMH   HMC     REFCODE   STATE     STATUS  CALLHOME  FAILING_MTMS      TEXT                                         
02/13/2019 23:02:31  7        -     hmc01   #25B810   approved  Open    false     8231-E2B/06A084P  File System alert event occurred...          
02/16/2019 16:14:28  8        -     hmc01   B3030001  approved  Open    false     8231-E2B/06A084P  ACT04284I A Management Console connect failed
02/11/2019 16:12:43  37       -     hmc02   B3030001  approved  Open    false     8231-E2B/06A084P  ACT04284I A Management Console connect failed
02/11/2019 17:43:19  38       -     hmc02   B3030001  approved  Open    false     8231-E2B/06A084P  ACT04283I A connection to a FSP,BPA...  
$

This article is about the problem with the number 7. The problem was noted on 13.02.2019 at 23:02:31, and examined by the HMC with the name hmc01. The error code is #25B810. The problem is in the “open” state, a call home has not been triggered. For further information, please refer to the problem on the managed system with serial number 06A084P, a Power 710 (8231-E2B). The beginning of the error message can be found in the last column.

First, let’s look at the whole record of the problem by specifying the problem number and HMC:

$ hmc lssvcevents -p 7 hmc01
analyzing_hmc: hmc01
analyzing_mtms: 7042-CR8/21009CD
approval_state: approved
callhome_intended: false
created_time: 02/14/2019 04:11:31
duplicate_count: 0
eed_transmitted: false
enclosure_mtms: 8231-E2B/06A084P
event_severity: 0
event_time: 02/13/2019 23:02:31
failing_mtms: 8231-E2B/06A084P
files: iqyymrge.log/Consolidated system platform log,
iqyvpd.dat/Configuration information associated with the HMC,
actzuict.dat/Tasks performed,
iqyvpdc.dat/Configuration information associated with the HMC,
problems.xml/XML version of the problems opened on the HMC for the HMC and the server,
refcode.dat/list of reference codes associated with the hmc,
iqyylog.log/HMC firmware log information,
PMap.eed/Partition map, obtained from 'lshsc -w -c machine',
hmc.eed/HMC code level obtained from 'lshmc -V' and connection information obtained from 'lssysconn -r all',
sys.eed/Output of various system configuration commands,
8231-E2B_06A084P.VPD.xml/Configuration information associated with the managed system
first_time: 02/14/2019 04:11:31
last_time: 02/14/2019 04:11:31
problem_num: 7
refcode: #25B810
reporting_mtms: 8231-E2B/06A084P
reporting_name: p710
status: Open
sys_mtms: 8231-E2B/06A084P
sys_name: p710
sys_refcode: #25B810
text: File System alert event occurred on /home/ios/CM/DB. Free space is less than 10%, or there was an error querying the filesystem.

At the end of the issue we find the unabbreviated error message. It’s about a file system that has less than 10% free space. The path “/home/ios/CM/DB” indicates a virtual I/O server. The relevant virtual I/O servers are located on the managed system with the serial number 06A084P:

$ ms show 06A084P
NAME  SERIAL_NUM  TYPE_MODEL  HMCS        
p710  06A084P     8231-E2B    hmc01,hmc02
$

It is the managed system named, p710. The managed system includes the following virtual I/O servers:

$ vios -m p710 show
LPAR     ID  SERIAL    LPAR_ENV   MS    HMCs
aixvio1  1   06A084P1  vioserver  p710  hmc01,hmc02
$

A check of the error report on the Virtual I/O Server aixvio1 shows the following entry:

LABEL:          VIO_ALERT_EVENT
IDENTIFIER:     0FD4CF1A

Date/Time:       Wed Feb 13 22:02:31 CST 2019
Sequence Number: 98
Machine Id:      00F6A0844C00
Node Id:         aixvio1
Class:           O
Type:            INFO
WPAR:            Global
Resource Name:   /home/ios/CM/DB 

Description
Informational Message

Probable Causes
Asynchronous Event Occurred

Failure Causes
PROCESSOR

        Recommended Actions
        Check Detail Data

Detail Data
Alert Event Message
25b810
A File System alert event occurred on /home/ios/CM/DB. Free space is less than 10%, or there was an error querying the filesystem.

Diagnostic Analysis
Diagnostic Log sequence number: 19
Resource tested:        sysplanar0
Menu Number:            25B810
Description:


 File System alert event occurred on /home/ios/CM/DB. Free space is less than 10%, or there was an error querying the filesystem.

A quick check of the file system shows that the problem has already been resolved, and there is enough space:

$ df -g
Filesystem    GB blocks      Free %Used    Iused %Iused Mounted on
...
/dev/hd1           0.25      0.16   35%      111     1% /home
...
$ 

So the problem does not exist anymore. Therefore, the service event on the HMC should also be closed, which we do now:

$ hmc chsvcevent -o close -p 7 hmc01
$

For review we list the open service events:

$ hmc lssvcevents 
TIME                 PROBLEM  PMH   HMC     REFCODE   STATE     STATUS  CALLHOME  FAILING_MTMS      TEXT                                         
02/16/2019 16:14:28  8        -     hmc01   B3030001  approved  Open    false     8231-E2B/06A084P  ACT04284I A Management Console connect failed
02/11/2019 16:12:43  37       -     machmc  B3030001  approved  Open    false     8231-E2B/06A084P  ACT04284I A Management Console connect failed
02/11/2019 17:43:19  38       -     machmc  B3030001  approved  Open    false     8231-E2B/06A084P  ACT04283I A connection to a FSP,BPA...   
$ 

The event with the number 7 was closed successfully.

Service events are easy to manage with the LPAR tool!

Migration from SDDPCM to AIX PCM

Many AIX systems still use SDDPCM as a multipathing solution. However, SDDPCM is no longer supported on POWER 9 hardware from IBM.

The following is the migration from SDDPCM to AIX PCM. On our example system we have the following physical volumes:

$ lspv
hdisk0          00abcdefabcde000                    datavg          active     
hdisk1          00abcdefabcde001                    datavg          active     
hdisk2          none                                None                       
hdisk3          00abcdefabcde003                    altinst_rootvg             
hdisk4          00abcdefabcde004                    rootvg          active     
$

The Physical Volumes are disks that are made available through an SVC:

$ lsdev -l hdisk0 -F uniquetype
disk/fcp/2145
$

The Path Control Module (PCM) uses SDDPCM:

$ lsattr -El hdisk0 -a PCM -F value
PCM/friend/sddpcm
$

You can also see this when looking at the list of kernel extensions:

$ genkex | grep pcm
f1000000c012a000    af000 /usr/lib/drivers/sddpcmke
$

Which PCM driver is used for which disk types can be easily viewd with the command “manage_disk_drivers”:

$ manage_disk_drivers -l
Device              Present Driver        Driver Options    
2810XIV             AIX_AAPCM             AIX_AAPCM,AIX_non_MPIO
DS4100              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS4200              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS4300              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS4500              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS4700              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS4800              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS3950              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS5020              AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DCS3700             AIX_APPCM             AIX_APPCM
DCS3860             AIX_APPCM             AIX_APPCM
DS5100/DS5300       AIX_SDDAPPCM          AIX_APPCM,AIX_SDDAPPCM
DS3500              AIX_APPCM             AIX_APPCM
XIVCTRL             MPIO_XIVCTRL          MPIO_XIVCTRL,nonMPIO_XIVCTRL
2107DS8K            NO_OVERRIDE           AIX_AAPCM,AIX_non_MPIO,NO_OVERRIDE
IBMFlash            NO_OVERRIDE           AIX_AAPCM,AIX_non_MPIO,NO_OVERRIDE
IBMSVC              NO_OVERRIDE           AIX_AAPCM,AIX_non_MPIO,NO_OVERRIDE
$

In our case, SVC disks, the last line is relevant (IBMSVC). As current PCM driver NO_OVERRIDE is listed here, possible other drivers are AIX_AAPCM (AIX PCM for active / active and ALUASystems) and AIX_non_MPIO (drives without multi-pathing). The value NO_OVERRIDE means that if no multipathing driver is explicitly specified, a multipathing driver is used if possible (if available), otherwise no multipathing driver is used. If more than one multipathing driver is available (in our case AIX PCM and SDDPCM, then SDDPCM has priority).

In a subsequent blog entry, we will take a closer look at the possible values, as well as the point in AIX where the selection is made.

Before we change the driver for IBMSVC disks (a reboot is necessary), let’s take a look at the attributes of our disks, here an example for the hdisk0:

$ lsattr -El hdisk0
PCM             PCM/friend/sddpcm                                   PCM                                     True
...
algorithm       load_balance                                        Algorithm                               True+
...
queue_depth     120                                                 Queue DEPTH                             True+
...
reserve_policy  no_reserve                                          Reserve Policy                          True+
...
$

Changing the driver will cause the values of some set attributes to be lost or replaced by new default values of the new driver. This is especially true for the queue_depth (here: 120), the reserve_policy (here: no_reserve) and the load-balancing policy (algorithm). The current values should be noted, then after the conversion to the AIX PCM driver then adjust accordingly.

Switching to AIX PCM can be done with the command “manage_disk_drivers”. For this, the command is given the disk type (here IBMSVC) with the option “-d” and the desired driver (here AIX_AAPCM for the AIX PCM driver) with the option “-o”:

# manage_disk_drivers -d IBMSVC -o AIX_AAPCM
********************** ATTENTION *************************
  For the change to take effect the system must be rebooted
#

The changed configuration can be listed directly with “manage_disk_drivers -l”:

$ manage_disk_drivers -l
Device              Present Driver        Driver Options    
...
IBMSVC              AIX_AAPCM             AIX_AAPCM,AIX_non_MPIO,NO_OVERRIDE
$

To make the change, the system must now be rebooted:

# shutdown -r now

SHUTDOWN PROGRAM
Thu Feb  7 09:43:38 CET 2019
...

We execute the 3 commands from the beginning again (lspv, lsdevund lsattr):

$ lspv
hdisk0          00abcdefabcde000                    datavg          active     
hdisk1          00abcdefabcde001                    datavg          active     
hdisk2          none                                None                       
hdisk3          00abcdefabcde003                    altinst_rootvg             
hdisk4          00abcdefabcde004                    rootvg          active     
$

The physical volumes are unchanged.

$ lsdev -l hdisk0 -F uniquetype
disk/fcp/mpioosdisk
$

The type of disks has changed from disk / fcp / 2145 to disk / fcp / mpioosdisk. This already indicates that the multipathing driver has changed.

$ lsattr -El hdisk0 -a PCM -F value
PCM/friend/fcpother
$

The Path Control Module (PCM) has also changed. The guy is no longer sddpcm but fcpother. That does not look directly after AIX PCM. However, a look at the corresponding driver shows immediately that AIX PCM is in use here:

$ lsdev -P -c PCM -s friend -t fcpother -F DvDr
aixdiskpcmke
$

The associated kernel extension aixdiskpcmke is also currently loaded and in use:

$ genkex | grep pcm
         73e2000    57000 /usr/lib/drivers/aixdiskpcmke
$

Let’s take a look at the attributes of hdisk0 again. We expect changed values for some attributes here:

$ lsattr -El hdisk0
PCM             PCM/friend/fcpother                                 Path Control Module              False
...
algorithm       fail_over                                           Algorithm                        True+
...
queue_depth     20                                                  Queue DEPTH                      True+
...
reserve_policy  single_path                                         Reserve Policy                   True+
...
$

The value 120 for the queue_depth has been lost and has been replaced by the default value 20. The reserve_policy has changed to single_path and the load-balancing algorithm is now fail_over, i. only one path is used at a time.

We change the settings to a configuration that corresponds to the initial situation:

# chdev -P -l hdisk0 -a algorithm=shortest_queue -a queue_depth=120 -a reserve_policy=no_reserve
hdisk0 changed
#

Since the Physical Volume is in use, the setting can only be changed in the ODM and a further reboot is necessary.

After all disks have been reconfigured via the ODM, the system must be rebooted a second time:

# shutdown -r now

SHUTDOWN PROGRAM
Thu Feb  6 20:07:12 CET 2019
...

After the reboot SDDPCM can be uninstalled:

# installp -u devices.fcp.disk.ibm.mpio.rte devices.sddpcm.72.rte
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                    Pre-deinstall Verification...
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Verifying selections...done
Verifying requisites...done
Results...

SUCCESSES
...
0503-292 This update will not fully take effect until after a
        system reboot.

    * * *  A T T E N T I O N  * * *
    System boot image has been updated. You should reboot the
    system as soon as possible to properly integrate the changes
    and to avoid disruption of current functionality.

installp:  bosboot process completed.
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                                Summaries:
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Installation Summary
--------------------
Name                        Level           Part        Event       Result
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
devices.sddpcm.72.rte       2.7.1.1         ROOT        DEINSTALL   SUCCESS   
devices.sddpcm.72.rte       2.7.1.1         USR         DEINSTALL   SUCCESS   
devices.fcp.disk.ibm.mpio.r 1.0.0.25        USR         DEINSTALL   SUCCESS   
#

The SDDPCM fileset, as well as the associated host-attachment fileset, were successfully uninstalled.

Since the SDDPCM driver was not loaded, and thus no changes have been made to the kernel, actually another reboot should not be necessary. However, since it is explicitly pointed out a quick reboot, and it is also a good idea to do a reboot test with the final configuration, we reboot the system a third and final time:

# shutdown -r now

SHUTDOWN PROGRAM
Thu Feb  6 20:17:21 CET 2019
...

After the reboot, we check the disk attributes again:

$ lsattr -El hdisk0
PCM             PCM/friend/fcpother                                 Path Control Module              False
...
algorithm       shortest_queue                                      Algorithm                        True+
...
queue_depth     120                                                 Queue DEPTH                      True+
...
reserve_policy  no_reserve                                          Reserve Policy                   True+
...
$

The system now uses the AIX PCM driver for multipathing:

$ manage_disk_drivers -l
Device              Present Driver        Driver Options    
...
IBMSVC              AIX_AAPCM             AIX_AAPCM,AIX_non_MPIO,NO_OVERRIDE
$

Migrating from SDDPCM to AIX PCM is pretty easy to do.

“who -r” does not return run level

On one of our systems, the command “who -r” did not return run level information. No error message was shown:

$ who -r
$ echo $?
0
$

As a consequence, an install script terminated with an error, since it was not able to determine the run level.

The information about the run level comes from the binary log file /etc/utmp. The run level is stored as the second record in this file. We assumed that /etc/utmp contained corrupt records.

The command /usr/sbin/acct/fwtmp (bos.acct) can be used to convert binary utmp-records to ASCII (and vice versa). The command expects the records to convert on standard input. In our case we got:

$ cat /etc/utmp | /usr/sbin/acct/fwtmp
                        system boot   2     0 0000 0000 1484666008                                  Tue Jan 17 16:13:28 CET 2017
root                                  0 804397248 0000 0000          0 \ufffd{\ufffd\ufffd                             Thu Jan  1 01:00:00 CET 1970
         naudio                       8 3473526 0000 0000 1484666008                                  Tue Jan 17 16:13:28 CET 2017
         naudio2                      8 3539068 0000 0000 1484666008                                  Tue Jan 17 16:13:28 CET 2017
...

The output above confirmed that the second record was corrupt, since it obviously did not contained the run level. Comparing with the entries from a working system showed how the correct records should look like:

                        system boot   2     0 0000 0000 1545044734                                  Mon Dec 17 12:05:34 2018
                        run-level 2   1     0 0062 0123 1545044734                                  Mon Dec 17 12:05:34 2018

First of all we made a copy of the corrupt /etc/utmp. Then we created an ASCII version using the above fwtmp command:

# cp /etc/utmp /etc/utmp.orig
# cat /etc/utmp | /usr/sbin/acct/fwtmp -X -L >/etc/utmp.ascii
#

The options -X and -L ensure that user and host names are not shortened.

Using an editor, we corrected the second entry by using the corresponding entry from the working system above. Then we corrected the timestamps by taking the values from the first entry. All in all the corrected version was:

                        system boot   2     0 0000 0000 1484666008                                  Tue Jan 17 16:13:28 CET 2017
                        run-level 2   1     0 0062 0123 1484666008                                  Tue Jan 17 16:13:28 CET 2017
         naudio                       8 3473526 0000 0000 1484666008                                  Tue Jan 17 16:13:28 CET 2017
...

Now we converted the corrected ASCII version back to the binary format and stored that version under /etc/utmp:

# cat /etc/utmp.ascii | /usr/sbin/acct/fwtmp -ic > /etc/utmp
#

Finally the command “who -r” worked again:

$ who -r
   .        run-level 2 Jan 17 16:13       2    0    S
$

The problem was resolved.

/usr/sbin/rpm_share[440]: 36044986 Illegal instruction

The above error message showed up during the installation of an RPM package:

# rpm -U db4-4.7.25-2.aix5.1.ppc.rpm 
/usr/sbin/rpm_share[440]: 36044986 Illegal instruction
rpm_share: 0645-007 ATTENTION: get_rpm_inst_root_list() returned an unexpected result.
rpm_share: 0645-007 ATTENTION: update_inst_root() returned an unexpected result.

The rpm-command no longer works, a rebuild of the RPM database is therefore not possible anymore:

# rpm --rebuilddb
/usr/sbin/rpm_share[470]: 22478966 Illegal instruction

Reinstalling the fileset rpm.rte fixes the problem:

# installp -acFXYd . rpm.rte
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
                    Pre-installation Verification...
+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+

...

Installation Summary
--------------------
Name                        Level           Part        Event       Result
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
rpm.rte                     4.13.0.3        USR         APPLY       SUCCESS    
rpm.rte                     4.13.0.3        ROOT        APPLY       SUCCESS

Afterwards the rpm-command works again:

# rpm -qa
...
db4-4.7.25-2.ppc
...
AIX-rpm-7.1.5.15-7.ppc

 

LPAR tool is available now

Starting from  5th november 2018 the LPAR-Tool is officially available.

A version for Linux can be downloaded from the download area (versions for AIX and MacOS will follow soon). A user guide is in preparation.

To test the LPAR tool free of charge:

  1. Download the current version of the LPAR tool from the download area.
  2. Request a trial license.
  3. Install the LPAR tool.

Have fun testing the LPAR tool.

Ab 05.11.2018 ist das LPAR-Tool nun offiziell verfügbar!